packaged

packaged
package package 2 verb [transitive]
1. TRANSPORT also package up to wrap or pack something so that it is ready to be sent somewhere:

• Many firms send components overseas to be packaged.

• materials for packaging food and consumer products

— packaged adjective :

• nutritional labeling on packaged food

• the Anglo-Dutch packaged goods giant Unilever

2. MARKETING to put goods or services together and sell them as a set :

• The company packaged the software with other IBM products.

3. MARKETING to prepare something for sale, especially by adding something to it or by making it more attractive to buyers:

• She built a video empire by packaging her own fitness routines and selling them to millions of Americans.

4. FINANCE if a financial institution packages loans, it buys the loans from lenders such as banks and uses the loans as backing for bonds. The financial institution uses the repayments on these loans to make payments to investors who buy the bonds. Money that the lenders get from the financial institution when it sells the bonds is used to make more loans to customers:

• As seller of the mortgages, American Mortage forwarded repayments to the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, which had bought the loans and packaged them into securities.

— see also asset-backed security security

* * *

packaged UK US /ˈpækɪdʒd/ adjective COMMERCE
sold in a package: »

The majority of food sold in supermarkets is packaged.

»

They stock frozen, canned, and packaged goods.

»

Prevent or reduce waste by avoiding buying over-packaged goods.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • packaged — (p[a^]k [asl]jd), adj. Enclosed in a package[2] or protective covering; as, packaged cereals. [Narrower terms: {prepackaged, pre packaged, prepacked ] {unpackaged, loose} Syn: wrapped, done up. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • packaged — pack|aged [ pækıdʒd ] adjective 1. ) sold in a package: packaged foods 2. ) deliberately created or shown in a way that is intended to be interesting or exciting to the public: Is there room for yet another packaged pop group? …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • packaged — UK [ˈpækɪdʒd] / US adjective 1) sold in a packet packaged foods 2) deliberately created or shown in a way that is intended to be interesting or exciting to the public Is there room for yet another packaged pop group? …   English dictionary

  • packaged — / pækɪdʒd/ adjective put into a package ● packaged goods ▪▪▪ ‘…in today’s fast growing packaged goods area many companies are discovering that a well recognized brand name can be a priceless asset’ [Duns Business Month] …   Marketing dictionary in english

  • packaged — mod. alcohol intoxicated. □ Man, Bart was really packaged last night! □ By midnight she was totally packaged …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • packaged — adj. Packaged is used with these nouns: ↑soup …   Collocations dictionary

  • packaged — adjective specially wrapped and put in a container for selling: The soap was beautifully packaged in a special gift box …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • packaged — package ► NOUN 1) an object or group of objects wrapped in paper or packed in a box. 2) N. Amer. a packet. 3) (also package deal) a set of proposals or terms offered or agreed as a whole. 4) informal a package holiday. 5) Computing a collection… …   English terms dictionary

  • packaged — adjective enclosed in a package or protective covering packaged cereals • Ant: ↑unpackaged • Similar to: ↑prepackaged, ↑prepacked …   Useful english dictionary

  • packaged software — ➔ software * * * packaged software UK US noun [U] IT ► computer software that is designed so that it can be used by a lot of different people or companies: »Unfortunately there is no packaged software to do these very specialized tasks …   Financial and business terms

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